Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Awaiting The Chance to Take The Hoyas’ Side

Awaiting The Chance to Take the Hoyas’ Side

By Sean P. Flynn Hoya Staff Writer Like a large portion of the North American population, I was brought up hating Georgetown athletics. By the end of my four years here, though, I was completely wrapped up in it.

Almost my entire Georgetown career can be defined by covering Georgetown sports for The Hoya. I came up to the open house before school started my freshman year, and within a month I had written my first story, a masterpiece of a women’s soccer story.

After two semesters as an assistant editor, I became senior sports editor during the second semester of my sophomore year, and there began a string of four semesters at that position, where I had no choice but to be completely immersed in Hoya athletics.

At The Hoya we tried to be as professional as possible, yet at the same time we knew that we had limits, for a variety of reasons ranging from lack of know-how to time constraints to homework. I’d venture to say we spent 40 hours a week on The Hoya (it could have been more) trying to make the best paper possible. Still, there were always the obligatory mistakes that continue to haunt me to this day. Like the cleverly headlined feature about Georgetown quarterback Bill Ward: “Bill’s Ward’s Excellent Adventure.” Or the swimming story that said “See Page 13” but didn’t appear on page 13, or any other page.

Covering sports as a student is a complicated task, and it is more complicated at Georgetown. To interview a coach or an athlete – even if the athlete is your girlfriend or your next-door neighbor – you have to go through the sports information department, an underfunded, undermanned office that is asked to handle more than it can. Just setting up the interviews and getting stats from sports information often took up half of our time before we had even typed the stories and laid out the pages.

The other tough task was finding someone to write the stories. ost of the people who came to write for the sports section either wanted to write men’s basketball or write columns, which meant that of course not everyone could be accommodated. Football, soccer, basketball, baseball and lacrosse were easier to It has been fun, but next year it’ll be nice to finally be able to watch Georgetown sports as a vocal, completely partial Hoya fan, and not worry about where it will show up in the newspaper.

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