Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Get Involved in ANC

Every two years, Georgetown University students get to elect one of their own to public office as a member of the Advisory Neighborhood Commission. Unfortunately, too few students realize that this also means they have the opportunity to compete for that office. Since the 2003 redrawing of ANC districts, three consecutive elections for district 2E04, which encompasses most of the Georgetown campus, have been uncontested. This year, Jenna Lowenstein (COL ’09) is assured victory in November.

In 2003, the ANC redrew districts such that one district (2E04) is almost entirely within Georgetown’s gates, thus assuring at least one student representative on the Commission. A mix of students and local residents comprise two other districts: 2E02 and 2E03. Despite the significant local political power of the ANC, no Georgetown students have run for the latter two seats since 2002, and one student has run each year for E204 in that time.

As students constantly speak of concerns about neighborhood relations, area safety and alcohol policies, it is essential that more Georgetown students become active in the ANC election process in order to ensure that the most qualified representative is elected. More students competing for the seat will force every candidate to demonstrate worthy campaigns, skills and goals to Georgetown students living as residents of the District.

It is important to note that running for ANC is not a simple process. The candidates must be residents of the District, therefore sacrificing their right to vote in elections back home. Still, the opportunity to hold office while still in college is rare and certainly one that students should not pass up due to inconveniences. At a school so known for its politically inclined students, there is no reason for Georgetown’s own local representation to be a less competitive office to win than the prestigious position of NSO Orientation Advisor.

To give a sense of what the ANC commissioner deals with and will be expected to contribute to throughout a term, one need not look further than the most basic aspects of Georgetown’s policy-making. The ANC plays an integral role in structuring the university’s 10-year plans which are rarely discussed amongst students but greatly impact university buildings, enrollment and infrastructure.

While these larger concerns have long-lasting repercussions, the day-to-day tasks of the representative are also crucial to the functioning of this student body. Georgetown’s ANC Commissioner serves as the primary liaison between the students, the university administration, and the non-student residents of Georgetown on matters of noise violations, public disturbances, police patrols and zoning issues, to name just a few. Clearly, there are few positions of greater importance to Georgetown University than that of the ANC commissioner, and so electing our finest representative should be a much higher priority than the previous uncontested elections indicate it has become.

Georgetown has been fortunate to have two talented commissioners ichael Glick (COL ’05) and Brett Clements (COL ’07) for the last four years. Despite not having been forced to competitively campaign, Glick and Clements nevertheless represented Georgetown’s interests well in the face of often-strong local opposition.

There is certainly no reason to think that Lowenstein (COL ’09) will be any different. As she has worked closely with Clements in the past, there is little doubt that she will be prepared to carry out her duties and continue on a trend of successful commissioners. Still, the fate of Georgetown’s representation on the ANC would be much more certain if more students took interest in running for the office every two years.

More to Discover