Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Leo’s Weak Weekends

While it remains impossible for the Leo O’Donovan Dining Hall to accommodate every student’s varied tastes, the recent steps Marriot has taken to respond to student concerns and diversify food options in the dining hall have at least managed to relieve some of the monotony by providing more options at each meal. Yet on weekends, the wide range of dining selection diminishes, and the dining hall continues to prompt student discontent.

Come Friday and Saturday night, student satisfaction stops being the top priority of the dining hall, as it diverts its attention to its black-tie patrons on the top floor. Students are ushered to the often-crowded lower level, and all previous notions of diversified food selection seem to disappear. Instead of the normal five or six specialty selections of the day, there are only two or three. Vegetarians are left with the tedium of pasta, pizza and salad that they got tired of during the first weeks of school.

Although to some extent decreased attendance at the dining hall may account for the more limited options, the sub-par food selection offered causes even more students to opt for dinner elsewhere. The idea of dealing with crowds on the weekend only compounds this motivation. And while there are fewer students in the dining hall on weekends, its one open floor is still filled above capacity.

The problem of seating is addressed at brunch when the dining hall again opens its upper level to students. Yet the selection at brunch is little different from that of breakfast during the week, except for pizza and pasta and the omelets, without which there would be no reason not to skip brunch entirely and just get a sandwich at Wisemiller’s. The extra seating is a relief, but the lower level remains crowded because none of the serving equipment on the top level is operational, forcing all students to first go downstairs to get their food. Simply filling beverage machines on Saturday and Sunday mornings would do a great deal to bring patrons upstairs, and make brunch much more pleasant and convenient.

If Marriot continues to make food options interesting and numerous and can start being more consistent with their services on both weekdays and weekends, then even students continually dissatisfied with the dining options on campus cannot help but think as Marriot’s contract is renegotiated that this devil we’ve come to know all too well is better than the devil we don’t know.

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