Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

News in Brief

Financial Times Ranks MSB Graduate Program in Top 20 in Country The McDonough School of Business’ master’s program improved one spot in the Financial Times’ recently-released rankings, to 19th in the country. While Georgetown’s global ranking remained in the 38th spot, it was ranked seventh in “Best in Corporate Strategy” and third in “Best in International Business.” The rankings are based upon a series of evaluations in alumni career progress, diversity and faculty doctoral percentages and research capabilities. “We are very pleased with our continued rise in the rankings. These rankings are particularly important to us because they reflect a great deal of positive feedback from our alumni,” said George Daly, dean of the McDonough School of Business. University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, Columbia Business School and Stanford’s Graduate School of Business were named as the three best business schools in the country. Stanford graduates rank first in salary, earning an average $175,766. Georgetown graduates rank 18th in the same category, with an average income of $120,346 for graduates. “Everyone at the McDonough School is working to make sure that we continue to stand out as a compelling and distinctive choice in an increasingly competitive educational marketplace,” Daly said. “As part of this effort, our faculty is working to enhance our MBA curriculum, and we are recruiting a number of seasoned and distinguished scholars to the school,” he added. The MSB anticipates opening its new building next year, something Daly said will further improve the school. “The new building will give us an opportunity to expand what the McDonough School has to offer,” Daly said. “It will help us attract a larger pool of applicants, and it will help us broaden the scope of companies that come to recruit on campus. All of these things factor into the rankings.” – Mary Orton New Corp Leaders Pledge to Make Shareholder Input Priority The Corp’s new leadership will try to involve students more closely in the company’s operations, the incoming president and chief executive officer said. The new student leaders include Chief Executive Officer Jesse Scharff (COL ’09), Chief Financial Officer Kevin Lynch (COL ’09) and Chief Operating Officer Adah Berkovich (SFS ’09). Scharff said that returning to the company’s grassroots origins by building a shareholder mentality is the new leadership’s top priority. Scharff said that all students are essentially shareholders because of their ability to influence the offerings of The Corp’s businesses, encouraging students to express what they want from The Corp. The students, as shareholders, can push for greater dividends through vocalizing their wishes and desires on what they would like to see the company offer, Scharff said. “The Corp, as a non-profit, gives dividends in a different way,” Scharff said. The Corp’s dividends are paid out as The Corp “[tries] to do more to serve students,” Scharff said. All ideas on the course the company takes come from Georgetown students, said Jillian Perlow (COL ’08), who previously served as The Corp’s chief financial officer. Recently, The Corp has taken on an increased level of interest in making all students feel like shareholders who can influence and steer the course of action taken by the company. The Corp has recently instituted an e-mail account for suggestions and a contest in which students can create their own sandwich for Vital Vittles. “If a student has an idea which we can feasibly provide, whether for a new store or option, we are open to these ideas,” Perlow said. – Brad Pollina Focusing the Nation, Hoyas on Global Warming Georgetown joined more than 1,000 universities across the country this week as part of Focus the Nation’s National Teach-In on Global Warming initiative to combat global warming. On Thursday, Daniel Lashof, science director of the climate center of the National Resource Defense Council, lectured to an audience of about 50 people in Reiss Science Building on the impending dangers of global warming if the status quo continues. These dangers include the risk of more powerful hurricanes, red tides, increased asthma, infectious disease, heat stress and allergies, he said. “About 40 percent of the polar ice caps have melted away since 1979, and if the current path of [carbon dioxide] emissions continues, they will be completely melted by as early as 2020,” Lashof said. He emphasized the need for the United States to cut their emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Electricity use is the biggest contributing factor to the problem. “We have to sweat the small stuff at this stage; we have to go after everything, including vehicle efficiency, renewable energy sources and geologic disposal of [carbon dioxide],” Lashof said. Other events on Thursday included a presentation by Lester Brown, president and senior researcher at the Earth Policy Institute and author of “Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization,” as well as a book signing with Brown and Georgetown biology professor Edward Barrows, author of “Nature, Gardens, and Georgetown.” The events were sponsored by the Georgetown University Bookstore, Campus Climate Challenge, Center for the Environment, The Corp, the biology department, EcoAction and the science, technology and international affairs program. – Mary McGuire Georgetown to Offer Joint Masters Degree with Virginia Polytechnic Institute Georgetown University and Virginia Polytechnic Institute have plans to create a joint Professional Science Masters degree in biomedical technology, development and management as part of a national trend to increase U.S. competition in the science sector. “It is a true joint degree [as opposed to a dual degree] – one degree with both school’s names on it,” said James Schaefer, associate dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Last August, Congress passed the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act to provide funding for professional science master’s degrees in American universities. Although Georgetown’s Board of Directors approved the program several years ago, and it was approved by Virginia Tech’s Board of Visitors in March, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia did not approve the new degree until this past month, according to their Jan. 7 meeting agenda. The two universities have plans to offer the degree starting this fall. The PSM degrees, influenced by the America COMPETES Act, began with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which started encouraging universities to expand their offerings and methods of scientific graduate degrees in 1997 in order to fulfill demand for scientists in the workforce. Other schools in the area, including The George Washington University and Towson University, launched their respective programs in molecular biotechnology and forensic science this academic year. American University’s tri-branched program in biotechnology, applied computing and environmental science and assessment was initiated in 2004. – Emily McGinnis

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