Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Psychiatry Professor Explains New Treatment

Psychiatry Professor Explains New Treatment

By Anne Rittman Hoya Staff Writer

Robert J. Hedaya, M.D., a clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University Hospital’s Department of Psychiatry, signed copies of his groundbreaking book about treatment of depression Thursday afternoon in the Georgetown University Medical Bookstore.

Hedaya’s book, “The Antidepressant Survival Program: How to Beat the Side Effects and Enhance the Benefits of Your Medication,” introduces a method of dealing with both clinical depression and side effects caused by depression. Designed to assist patients with treating depression, Hedaya’s book teaches patients how to eliminate and cope with side effects from antidepressants by regulating hormones and vitamins while also changing nutritional, sexual, relational and lifestyle habits rather than using the more common methods of changing medications.

Hedaya’s book may also help misdiagnosed patients with symptoms of another dysfunction which they may interpret as side effects of antidepressant medication. While the book intends to help patients directly, it also includes notes to doctors throughout to explain scientifically how the information in the book will work for the patient’s benefit. Additionally, the book includes advice for patients on how to communicate efficiently with their doctor. Hedaya’s book uses innovative methods for manipulating otherwise ignored factors to improve a patient’s overall health while undergoing treatment for depression. “There is no previous project [to control side effects],” claims Hedaya. “Before, you take your medications, you have side effects. You change your drugs to control the side effects. There is no progress.”

“Side effects are very treatable. You have to be careful because you could be dealing with things that mimic side effects or depression, and you must ultimately get to the root of the problem. With health care, there is not a lot of incentive to do that.”

Hedaya has been in practice since 1983. He completed his medical training at Georgetown University, and has worked at the National Institute of Health.

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