Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Racial Oversensitivity Distorts Campus Realities

To the Editor:

After reading Allison Carpenter’s letter in The Hoya entitled “Hoya Environment Unwelcoming to Minorities” (Nov. 2, 2004, A2), I came to one startling conclusion: the problem of integrating cultural and racial groups is still rampant at Georgetown.

More interestingly, the dilemma is not caused by secret and ultimately nonexistent white supremacist dealings behind closed doors. Instead, racial and cultural confusion is worsened by screaming hotheads like Carpenter.

She hypothesizes without merit or evidence that minorities are not in positions of power in The Hoya, nor do they represent a proportional cross-section of the staff because, she claims, The Hoya espouses a racist or at least unwelcoming environment.

It always strikes me as hypocritical and even downright silly that people who claim to be for racial and cultural integration are always the first ones to vociferously complain that if a minority is not present in a certain area or position in society, then the reason must be the color of that person’s skin.

Lest we forget that minorities (by the very nature of the term) make up a small section of Georgetown students. Perhaps the small minority population in campus groups parallels that overall reality.

Furthermore, maybe, by some stroke of chance, there are innocuous reasons why minority groups are not represented in many organizations.

If Georgetown is to successfully integrate cultural and racial minorities, people like Carpenter should not be jumping to unwarranted conclusions based on specious evidence.

Taken as a whole, Georgetown needs to stop going on excessive witch hunts for racial and cultural violators on campus. Granted, if an event on campus is deeply racist or disrespectful to a culture, then proper actions should be taken.

In Carpenter’s case, however, small misunderstood comments or statistical outliers in campus organizations should not ignite a volcano which sputters false and damaging accusations.

Jeff Katra (COL ’05) Nov. 2, 2004

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