Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Republican Rhetoric Undermines Debate

Eric Rodawig’s article “Mind Control is Dems’ Only Hope” (THE HOYA, Aug. 27, 2004, A3) represents an unfortunate example to new students of the type of political analysis to be expected from Georgetown students.

The emphasis on political discussion and debate is central to a university education and ought to be reflected in its media; hypocrisy and invective, in place of substantive analysis and criticism, appalls even someone who might otherwise agree with the author’s views.

Accusing the Democratic Party of subverting the American mind with a bombardment of political propaganda is unfair considering that the conservative “News Corp,” an umbrella media conglomerate that comprises Twentieth Century Fox, 175 newspapers and 35 TV stations, reaches more than 40 percent of the American public daily. The New York Times may embrace its leftist leaning, but they do have intelligent Republicans on their editorial staff. And that the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth could get such attention from the press seems to indicate that conservative viewpoints are far from censored. Still, if there is any role of media in a democracy, it is to investigate the truth, no matter the source. If the Democrats have such a stranglehold on the American press, why is there no investigation into George W. Bush’s war record, or the suspicious lack thereof? The author says that Kerry is allowed to “make the most ridiculous statements imaginable – and get away with them.” We merely direct anyone who sees through that sentence to go to www.bushisms.com. Speaking of seeing through sentences, we question this one: “the country agrees with more conservative social policies than liberal ones” – since when, the 2000 election? The Democratic Party’s candidate, Al Gore, won the popular vote by more than 500,000 votes that year. And then this one: “The left is no longer allowed to wallow in the government-subsidized immorality that they were used to under Clinton .” Is the author criticizing institutions like welfare and social security? Or merely wasteful spending? We simply ask who turned the projected $5.6 trillion surplus into a record-setting deficit? Increased spending after Sept. 11, 2001 , was understandable, but at what point did it necessitate a reckless and costly foreign policy and an unsustainable debt? As for the general thesis of the article, that the Democratic Party resorts to Orwellian tactics in order to gain its political agenda, we recommend anyone to read the bill known as the Patriot Act. Of course, this bill was originally supported by both parties, but this is an important point. Any political maneuvering with which the author might attempt to paint the Democratic Party is sure to be on his own clothes. For example, he criticizes the “intense and irrational hatred” and “bitter rage” against the Republican Party even while he compares Democrats to “Japanese kamikaze pilots” and inanely inserts a quotation such as “Liberals are wrong because they are liberals.” At what point do students engaging in political discussions simply regurgitate vain assertions without understanding the true substance that supports these assertions? There is an important place for the Republican spirit in the American political arena that is not merely anti-Democratic, but this author neither represents nor respects it.

A reasonable and intelligent political discussion must begin with a recognition that both parties have faults and merits and that neither party should be dogmatically defended or attacked. In the future, we hope that the author can redirect his clear passion for politics into a more substantive discussion that emphasizes analysis over rhetoric.

Kip Richardson is a junior in the College. Tony D’Arduini is a junior in the School of Foreign Service.

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