Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Time to Reprogram Floor Funds on Campus

Welcome to Georgetown. Now pay up.

Every year, it’s the same routine: You arrive on the Hilltop, move into your new room or apartment and attend the mandatory meeting for your area or floor. Those meetings convey important information to residents, but one feature in particular stands out as flawed: the floor funds each resident is told to pay.

Programming for freshman floors and Living and Learning Communities is important and can help students bond with each other and familiarize them with life at Georgetown – but that money should not come out of students’ wallets at the beginning of the year. Especially students living in apartment complexes, where living communities are rarely as strong as on a freshman floor (because residents don’t share bathrooms or common living spaces and typically have established groups of friends already), tend to reap few benefits from the dues they pay.

Floor funds should be included in student housing bills and the university should evenly allocate costs to students living on campus. That way, students wouldn’t be ambushed with a charge of up to $25 during their first few days on campus – probably the most expensive time of the year. The fund charged to the student housing bill should be a flat rate lower than the $25 expected contribution to a freshman floor or a floor in the Southwest Quad – perhaps $10.

Some resident assistants have creative ideas and plan excellent trips for residents, but others don’t. In a new system, those students who want to participate in supplemental events not covered by the charge to their housing bill could pay for that single event. This way, members of the community aren’t forced to pay for events in which they don’t participate beyond the initial cover charge of $10.

Floor fund contributions would depend on each residence hall floor or on-campus apartment complex, depending on the amount of student participation in funded events. (Floor funds currently operate under a similar system, with freshmen paying the most. Henle Village residents, for example, pay only $10.) With a new system, however, upperclassmen who aren’t active in their individual living communities wouldn’t have to pay anything beyond the $10 charge on the housing bill.

Until a plan like this is put in place, there should be greater transparency in the current system. Students should be able to see how much money is collected, where that money goes and how much remains toward the end of the year. At the very least, students deserve to know what their floor funds are spent on, and by seeing how much money remains, students might be encouraged to be more proactive in suggesting events or trips. If not, students deserve their money back.

*To send a letter to the editor on a recent campus issue or Hoya story or a viewpoint on any topic, contact [opinionthehoya.com](opinionthehoya.com). Letters should not exceed 300 words, and viewpoints should be between 600 to 800 words.*”

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