Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Being Grateful for Peers Expressing Strong Convict

VIEWPOINT Being Grateful for Peers Expressing Strong Convict By Stephanie Urra

The sun is shining. The birds are chirping. Those beautiful trees in the quad are blooming. This is the time of year when, on your walk to class, you wonder why you’re going to class and not involved in that Frisbee game on Healy Lawn or sunning yourself on the Esplanade. These are the days when you want to take advantage of every inch of green space on campus.

It seems almost offensive then, that Georgetown University Right to Life would choose one of these precious and fleeting days for a demonstration that devours most of Copley Lawn. Where am I supposed to lie out my blanket and do my reading? Where am I supposed to play catch with my roommate? Where is my friend supposed to sit and play his guitar? As a student, shouldn’t I be outraged at the fact that all those flags are infringing on my right to enjoy a onday afternoon?

And yet, somehow, I am grateful.

Somehow, all those pink and blue flags make me proud to be a Hoya. It reminds me that the students here care. The massive flag display conveys a deep devotion. And to me, that is invigorating. I could have gone to a school where my peers didn’t really care about anything – where I was lucky if the students knew where Israel and Palestine were, never mind why students might be outside holding an anti-violence protest.

Those little flags remind me that I go to a university where young men and women are willing to get up at 7 a.m. and place 3,643 flags in the cold, damp earth. What’s more, those same students are willing to sit in vigil at an information table – ready to answer any questions students, faculty, staff and visitors might have. I am honored to attend an institution whose members choose to get up early on Saturday mornings and stand outside Safeway all day collecting diapers and formula for under-privileged mothers in Washington, D.C. – rain or shine. I am delighted that my peers initiated a volunteer student-babysitting program for student mothers, making it possible for women to have children and still earn a Georgetown degree. I am absolutely thrilled that I can walk past a Right to Life table in Red Square and hear that, “pregnant women should keep their babies” and then see those same faces doing service projects at women’s shelters in the area, making their assertions a realistic possibility. I can’t help but be grateful that I go to a school where my peers express such strong convictions.

Each one of the 3,643 flags stands for one abortion that occurs each day in the United States. I posit that those tiny pennants stand for much more than that. They tell us that Georgetown is a community of believers – of men and women who will risk ridicule and harassment to uphold their cause. They tell us that the students here are both dreamers and doers, and that it’s okay to be both. And most importantly they tell us that there are still people in the world that earnestly believe that they can effect change, and inspire us to share that hope and faith.

So I can’t recline on Copley lawn today? Who cares? I’ll be way too busy thanking God that some of those people made their way to Georgetown.

Stephanie Urra is a sophomore in the College.

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