Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

GU Crew Begins Season With Warmup at Home

After weeks of grueling early morning practice on the Potomac River, the Georgetown crew program kicked off the fall season over the weekend at the Head of the Potomac regatta. The event featured several collegiate and club teams from the Washington, D.C., area.

In its first competition of the fall, the men’s varsity squad opened the year with good results across the board, including three first-place finishes.

In the men’s pair event, Georgetown took home the top five spots in the six-boat race. The two-man team of senior Dave Carter and junior Chris Griswold anchored the quintet with a time of 18:01 over the 2.8 mile race.

In the men’s four, the Hoyas placed first in a group of 10 with a time of 16:32. In the men’s open eight, Georgetown took home first and third place with times of 13:59 and 14:47, respectively.

With the season beginning and the team just starting to work together, men’s heavyweight Head Coach Tony Johnson took any success or failure from the race with a grain of salt.

“I don’t want to read too much into it,” Johnson said. “It was fun for a start.”

Women’s crew competed in the same event and placed third and fourth in the six-entry open eight event. The two crews were separated by only four tenths of a second, with times of 17:10.3 and 17:10.7 respectively.

In the women’s four event, the Georgetown women placed third, fourth and fifth. A squad from the Thompson Boat Club won the event with a time of 18:42.

Throughout the day, the women’s squads and the coaches were pleased with the execution during competition. One heavyweight squad, however, faced a stumbling block when a rower caught a crab, forcing her to lose control of her oar.

Nevertheless, women’s Head Coach Jimmy King emphasized that the women’s squads were using this race as a tune-up for the rest of this season, as well as the spring season.

“We use this as a competitive practice day,” King said. “It’s so hard to put anything into results this early. For this it was more going out and racing in a competitive atmosphere.”

The women’s program hopes to use this first race, as well as the rest of the fall season, to bring a team composed of many first-year competitors together and improve for the spring season.

“We’re really focused on bringing first-years together as a group and we’re focused on getting stronger,” King said. “We need to be working now to get stronger, we cannot wait for the spring.”

Also this weekend, the men’s lightweight program traveled to Sandy River, Va. to compete in the Occoquan Challenge. The Hoyas faced stiffer competition at the event, taking on national powerhouses such as Dartmouth and the Naval Academy.

The men competed in two races: the championship eight and the championship four. In the championship eight the men entered two squads placing in fourth and 10th with times of 14:16 and 14:50, respectively. Navy won the race with a time of 13:55 as Dartmouth placed in second at 14:06. A second Navy team also placed in front of Georgetown in third place with a time of 14:07.

In the championship four, the Hoyas entered three squads in the 21-boat race, placing third, fourth and 12th with times of 15:42, 15:45 and 16:37, respectively. Navy squads took home first and second place with times of 15:30 and 15:40. Dartmouth’s top squad placed in fifth place with a time of 15:47.

The men hope to build upon these encouraging results as the year goes on.

“Both men’s varsity crews have expectations of doing better than last year,” Johnson said. “There will be a lot of keen competition and we’re just getting started up now.”

The Georgetown crew program will next hit the water for the Head of the Charles regatta, which will take place in Boston, Mass. on Oct. 22.

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