Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Most Alcohol Amendments Accepted

While beer pong tables are back, make sure not to let the kegs pile up in your house.

Vice President for Student Affairs Todd Olson accepted four proposals for compromising student demands and university policies – beer pong tables will be allowed, party registration will be facilitated, the Student Code of Conduct will be made clearer and the two empty container limit in alcohol-free dorms will be maintained – while the one-keg limit still stands.

any students initially protested the alcohol changes last fall, which placed a limit on kegs, banned beer pong tables and made party registration more difficult. The unrest led to the establishment of the alcohol policy working group, a committee comprised of leaders from various campus organizations, last November. The committee made several recommendations to Vice President for Student Affairs Todd Olson, who reviewed the suggestions and called the changes “modest.”

The ban on drinking paraphernalia has been revised to now allow beer pong tables, though the working group’s suggestion to allow beer funnels was not accepted. Olson said he decided that while beer funnels “are still too dangerous to allow, students living on campus who are over the legal age are allowed to posses, and play beer pong.”

While beer pong is now allowed on campus, Olson warned that a student found guilty of an alcohol infraction could be more severely punished if a beer pong table is found in his on-campus residence.

Olson agreed with the proposals to streamline the party registration process through a new organization that will facilitate party registration, but he did not give further details. Attendance at an informational session, “I Know How to Party,” will be required before registering.

In addition, the language of the Student Code of Conduct will be refined, Olson said, to better explain the consequences for repeated alcohol infractions and to avoid student confusion. A separate frequently asked questions section will be created to answer student inquiries on alcohol sanctions and provide statistics on various punishments. The working group’s proposals maintained the standing university policy of possible suspension for third-strike violators.

“The way the code was written made [punishment] sound much more severe than what takes place in reality,” Olson said.

Finally, Olson maintained the current container policy that limits students to no more than two empty containers in the residence at any time. When asked whether empty cans or handles of alcohol constituted a container, Olson responded that a container was defined as “any container that is not a keg.”

Despite these changes, Olson rejected the working group’s proposal to change the campus keg limit back to the original number of two kegs, maintaining the current one-keg limit.

Still in place are the parameters for Category B alcohol violations, which are considered to be more serious violations, such as prohibiting misrepresentation of age, the sale of alcohol to anyone under the legal drinking age and providing or attempting to provide alcoholic beverages to any person who is intoxicated.

“There has been a lot of progress made, and it was done the right way,” said GUSA President Pat Dowd (SFS ’09), also the student association appointee to the working group. “The five suggestions represented a consensus of the students, and the changes represent a milestone,” he said.

Olson plans to officially release the policy revisions in the next few days, after which the student association will respond with a statement, according to Dowd. Its response will include steps on how to party responsibly and ways to obey the rules while still having fun.

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