Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Projector Reported Missing from Walsh

An investigation is underway to locate a Web page projector that has been missing from the Art, Music and Theater Department in the Walsh building for at least six days. This is the first disappearance of major electronic equipment from the art department.

The projector was reported missing from Walsh 297, a drawing studio, last Thursday, Sept. 21.

Professor John Morrell, who teaches painting and drawing in the Art, Music and Theater Department, is in charge of the use of the projectors in the classrooms. Morrell said he found the projector missing from the studio on Thursday morning and notified the Department of Public Safety and the Metropolitan Police Department.

Other professors who had used the room on Wednesday said they had noticed that the projector was not in its usual place. Morrell said he believes it was removed from the room on Tuesday night.

The room is usually locked, though students in the department know the combination to open it if they need to use the studio to work on assignments. The projector moves between a storage room and the classroom. Morrell said that the entire vicinity of the classroom was searched but the projector was not located.

The projector was purchased with donated funds earmarked for a project to link Georgetown art studios to the Internet. Morrell could not give a monetary value for the projector, saying only that the projector was valuable.

The projector could display images of works of art from museums around the world onto a classroom screen in order to illustrate lecture or discussion subjects. The project is a perfect example of how to use the Internet to facilitate art education, according to orrell.

Dr. Alison Hilton, the art history program chair, said the project is part of an overall movement to create new teaching environments in the department. The projector provides much more flexibility for teachers to reference works being studied in class.

The last time property was stolen from the Art, Music and Theater Department was two years ago, when a senior’s painting was discovered missing. Hilton was not certain whether that incident was one of theft by an outsider or by someone inside the university.

Despite low homicide rates, almost 20 percent of Washington, D.C.’s larceny and thefts occurred in the Second District in 1999, which consists of Georgetown and much of Northwest D.C.

The university’s building security system, run by DPS, includes a student guard desk as well as the Public Safety staff. Guards are also positioned near the entrances of residence halls and other buildings. The guard in the lobby of Walsh does not check identification of people entering Walsh itself, however, only of those entering the LXR residence.

The Art, Music and Theater Department is offering a $100 reward for any information about the projector’s whereabouts or its retrieval. The projector, along with other high-tech and expensive equipment, was a gift from a donor.

Anyone who has information regarding the projector should contact the Art, Music, and Theater Department at (202) 687-7010, DPS at (202) 687-4343 or MPD at (202) 727-1010.

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