Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Seniors Leave More Than Meets the Eye

By Michael J. Boyle

During beach week, Georgetown’s campus was an eerie place. ost of the underclassmen had gone home for the summer and the senior class had relocated to Myrtle Beach, S.C. On campus, the usual activities of students had been replaced by the bustle of maintenance crews who were busy scraping tape off lampposts, painting fences and cleaning gum off the ground in Red Square. These efforts seemingly aimed to remove any trace that students actually went to Georgetown.

The maintenance crews may have been successful in removing any physical traces that 6,000 twenty-somethings spent the previous nine months living here. However, one would be hard pressed if they tried to erase the marks that the 1,573 members of the Class of 2000 have left on Georgetown. For we have left many significant lasting marks on this university.

When we were getting our decision letters from Georgetown just over four years ago, we were hoping that because the envelope was a little thicker, that maybe we had been accepted to Georgetown. When we opened that envelope, feelings of excitement and joy ran through our bodies as we had, in fact, been accepted.

A few months later, in the fall of 1996, as the blue and gray balloons welcomed us across the Key Bridge, we embarked on our careers as Hoyas. At that point in time, there was nothing that held us together other than an admissions committee who thought we were all qualified to wear Georgetown’s colors for the next four years. Since that time we’ve experienced many highs and lows while here at Georgetown and we’ve turned into a family.

On Saturday, we’ll be sitting on Healy Lawn wearing our caps and gowns, experiencing our last moments as Georgetown students. For some of us, tears will begin to well up in our eyes; those tears should not be tears of sadness, but rather tears of joy as we think of the fond moments and experiences that our time at Georgetown has provided us with.

Georgetown has had a formative impact on all of us. At the same time we were having quite an impact on Georgetown. I’m proud to say that I’m graduating as a member of the Class of 2000, collectively we all have a lot to be proud of.

New groups have been created from Hoya Blue, Superfood and It’s For the Kids, to the Irish American Society, GUTV and the Saxa Server, while others like the Senior Class Committee, Georgetown Program Board, Sursum Corda and The Hoya have been brought to new levels of excellence. Traditions like Georgetown Day began, each student was anointed to be on either the Blue or Gray team and a real live version of Jack the Bulldog returned to the Hilltop. The lacrosse, football, soccer and volleyball teams achieved successes previously unattained at Georgetown. The Report on Student Life brought increased benefits for all student organizations and club sports just recently gained recognition and access to benefits, and our class was the first to experience a Senior Convocation during Senior Week.

All these achievements were attained through the talents, hard work and long hours that the Class of 2000 invested in Georgetown. They comprise many of the reasons why our class won’t soon be forgotten. In time, the individual faces behind these efforts will fade to black. Our names will be forgotten. However, we can rest assured that future generations of Hoyas will benefit from what we accomplished. Maybe one day our children or grandchildren will come to Georgetown and they’ll be on the same Blue or Gray team that their mother or father was during their college days.

In a few short days, when the Class of 2000 leaves Georgetown we’ll all be taking a piece of Georgetown with us and we’ll be leaving a piece of ourselves here with the many positive lasting marks we made on this school. Many of the benefits of what we’ve accomplished will not be ours to enjoy. But that didn’t stop us, we did it anyway. We had fun making Georgetown a better place for the Class of 2004 and all others who will follow in our footsteps.

This weekend, it’s going to be tough for me to walk through Healy Gates and away from the Hilltop for the last time as a student. Back in grammar school, when I went with my family on summer vacations, I never wanted to leave but somehow my parents always managed to drag me into the car and get me back home. I was such a stubborn child back then, and I think I might be even more stubborn today. But despite the best efforts that my transcript and I put up to try and stay at Georgetown for another year, I fear I will be graduating this weekend.

On Saturday afternoon during graduation, I’ll likely stare up at the Healy clock tower trying to figure out one last time how to steal those clock hands and will begin to get teary-eyed. Though I am afraid of what life will hold after Georgetown, I am not sad to be leaving the Hilltop. How could I be? It’s been too great a ride to leave here on a down note. Georgetown has provided me with so many friends, so many opportunities, so many memories. I love this place and I’ll never forget my time here. Thank you all for sharing the ride with me.

Michael J. Boyle is a senior in the McDonough School of Business.

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