Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Students’ Team Shouldn’t Take Students’ Money Too

CHIN MUSIC Students’ Team Shouldn’t Take Students’ Money Too

Get pumped: college basketball season is less than a month away, and you go to a big basketball school. That’s not all – just about every basketball analyst has Georgetown ranked in their top 25, and many of the same pundits write that your Hoyas are a lock to usurp Boston College as Big East Champions. Although I’m not quite ready to concur with these predictions, you can bet that I can’t wait for games to begin.

So I guess the next thing for me to do is go out and buy season tickets. Wait a second, did I just say buy season tickets? I thought that big basketball schools always attempted to encourage student support as much as possible by giving away free tickets to their young scholars. It appears somebody gave me some false information. I guess you can never trust those Stanford and Duke kids anyway. At any rate, those of you that wish to purchase student season ticket packages will have to shell out $65 for men’s tickets and/or $25 for women’s tickets, which I think is a lot to pay for the privilege of supporting your own university’s team.

Every year, Georgetown collects money from area residents who attend home games, apparel companies that use the team’s official logos and (hopefully) the NCAA for a little tournament appearance in March. But should students, who already pour money into the school in the form of tuition every year, be included in this group? That doesn’t seem fair, especially if one takes the position that this is the students’ university, not the administration’s or the athletic department’s.

It should also be pointed out that Georgetown students don’t have to obtain a ticket to see their football, lacrosse, soccer, volleyball, field hockey, tennis, sailing, baseball, golf, track, swimming and diving, or crew teams perform, but they have to pay to see their peers represent them on the basketball court. Why? Well, I won’t be able to answer that question in this column, because Georgetown University does not release any of their financial information. This means that I don’t know where ticket sale revenues end up. The $75 you pay for your tickets could be going back to the athletic department to pay for new uniforms, new equipment, and facility upgrades, or it could be going straight to MCI Center owner Ted Leonsis’ pocket. Although I’m confident the university is handling the money responsibly, the fact is that there is no way to know for sure.

Unless the university desperately needs the income generated by the sale of student tickets (which I find hard to believe), it seems no harm would come of offering them for free. For starters, attendance could only increase. Although I’m pretty sure students will attend this season’s men’s games in large numbers anyway, the athletic department might be hard pressed to fill seats during rebuilding years. Additionally, the women’s team has historically drawn smaller-than-deserved crowds, and students that are already hesitant to go to games certainly won’t rejoice over this year’s newly instituted $2-per game ticket price. More importantly, however, the university would send a clear message to students that they value their attendance for the sake of school spirit, not for the sake of capital gain. In my opinion, fostering a strong sense of community should be a university’s number one goal, and traditionally students have rallied around large athletic events. It is no small wonder that schools that win NCAA Division I championships one year see an increase in applications the next. Although providing free entry to students will not magically transform Georgetown into the proudest campus in the galaxy, it is at least a step in the right direction.

I should make it clear that none of this provides a good reason to refrain from buying a student ticket package, for this basketball season could very well be the best since Allen Iverson graced the Hilltop. Even though my $65 could conceivably be going to 10-year-old Maylasian children to increase output of Nike baseball caps with Jack the Bulldog’s likeness on them, you can bet I would pay twice that amount to see the Hoyas roll over UConn at the phone booth this season. Additionally, you will probably never be able to buy season tickets to see a major college basketball program for $65 after your time here at Georgetown, so don’t pass up this opportunity. However, you should remember that although the student season ticket situation is currently very good doesn’t mean that it could be even better.

Chin Music 2001 Season Of Miller, Monday Night Football Lack Laughs, Value -Oct. 19, 2001 Great Hoya Game Missed by Too any -Oct. 12, 2001 Football Could Learn Something -Oct. 5, 2001 Full Archive

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