Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

Georgetown University’s Newspaper of Record since 1920

The Hoya

The Case for Readership

Beginning this school year, the College Readership Program, a resource that offered free copies of [The New York Times](https://www.nytimes.com/), [The Washington Post](https://www.washingtonpost.com/) and [USA Today](https://www.usatoday.com/) on racks around campus, [is no longer available on campus](https://www.thehoya.com/news/college-readership-program-stalled-due-decreased-funding/). As a university community, we cannot afford to make its dissolution permanent.

[Launched by the Georgetown University Student Association and InterHall in the spring of 2008](https://www.thehoya.com/news/national-newspapers-to-be-distributed-on-campus/), the program was funded through contributions – $5,000 apiece – from five major campus organizations: GUSA, The Corp, the Office of the Senior Vice President, the Office of the Provost and InterHall. Coping with budget cuts, the latter three groups decreased their contributions, effectively extinguishing the program.

The program was a clear success during its one-year tenure; by noon on most weekdays last year, the stacks were empty. The economic concerns facing these administrative bodies and student organizations are understandable and very real, yet student awareness of local, national and world news is also vital to the Georgetown experience.

Georgetown students need daily exposure to current events. Goings-on in the world, while frequently referenced, are often not taught firsthand in classes – the College Readership Program was an effective method of bridging the gap between the theoretical material we encounter in the classroom and the realities of the world beyond the Hilltop.

We accept that InterHall reduced funding to the program because it is not directly related to its mission and that administrative offices have other priorities, but we call on the university community as a whole to seek out funding for this essential program. If InterHall cannot provide the full $5,000 it did last year, someone else needs to pick up that slack – another department, a member of the alumni community or an outside philanthropic source. As a last resort, direct financing from the university may be necessary in order to stop this resource from disappearing entirely from student life.

We commend GUSA and InterHall for working to fill the necessary void in funding for this program; The New York Times Co., for tentatively offering to deliver its newspaper to campus for significantly less money (discussions are currently underway between the company, GUSA and InterHall to reach a deal); and the McDonough School of Business Dean’s Office, for pledging to make a contribution to the program.

Georgetown’s mission statement calls for its students to be “lifelong learners” and “responsible and active participants in civic life.” Now is the university community’s opportunity to step up and continue its commitment to this mission.

*To send a letter to the editor on a recent campus issue or Hoya story or a viewpoint on any topic, contact [opinionthehoya.com](opinionthehoya.com). Letters should not exceed 300 words, and viewpoints should be between 600 to 800 words.*”

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